beer

Business partners Dick Doore and Eric Wallace founded Left Hand Brewing Company in September 1993, originally taking the name Indian Peaks Brewery.
“It is by far our most popular beer,” said Adam Lawrence, the head brewer at Left Hand brewing, about their Milk Stout.
Left Hand Brewing's head brewer Adam Lawrence leads a meeting between brewing shifts at their Longmont facility.
Barley is crushed and ground in a hopper before being added to the Milk Stout during the mash process.
The main brewing area at Left Hand Brewing Company in Longmont, CO.
Brewers at Left Hand Brewing use a chart to record and follow the brewing process.
Brewer Adam Cranford carries rolled oats up to the brew deck.
Brewer Adam Cranford sprays out the 'trub' (hop and malt sediment) from the whirlpool after a batch has been 'knocked out' (pumped from brew house to fermenter).
Different kinds of malt and lactose are staged and ready to be added to the brewing process.
Brewers lead a meeting before a shift change at Left Hand Brewing Company in Longmont, CO.
Boiling hot water, oats, barley, salt and other ingredients are added to the masher at the beginning of the brewing process.
Brewer Adam Cranford adds salt to the mash during the first stage of the brewing process. Adding salt helps adjust the water chemistry.
Most of the brewing equipment at Left Hand Brewing Company is computerized.
A dark roasted barley is added to the mash process during brewing of Milk Stout at Left Hand Brewing Company in Longmont, CO.
Brewer Adam Cranford keeps an eye on the "mashing in" or mash process where the ingredients like the milled grain are mixed with hot water, which is approximately 158° F (Fahrenheit) or 70° C (Celsius).
Brewer Adam Cranford keeps an eye on the "mashing in" or mash process where the ingredients like the milled grain are mixed with hot water, which is approximately 158° F (Fahrenheit) or 70° C (Celsius).
The "mashing in" or mash process is where the ingredients like the milled grain are mixed with hot water, which is approximately 158° F (Fahrenheit) or 70° C (Celsius). Mashing is the brewer's term for the hot water steeping process which hydrates the barley, activates the malt enzymes, and converts the grain starches into fermentable sugars. Brewers monitor the mash temperatures very closely.
Brewer Adam Cranford pumps the cooled wort into the fermenter at Left Hand Brewing Company in Longmont, CO.
Hops are weighed to add to the Milk Stout. Hops are the essence of beer brewing. They are the tiny cone-shaped flowers of the Humulus lupulus plant. Hops provide both bitterness (IBUs) and a wide variety of flavor to numerous beer styles.
Brewer Adam Cranford loads the 'hop pots' with hops. These hops are added at the beginning of the 60 minute boil for bittering. By adding different varieties of hops at different times during the boil, a more complex hop profile can be established that gives the beer a balance of hop bitterness, taste and aroma.
Brewer Adam Cranford tests the density of the wort throughout the brewing process at Left Hand Brewing Company in Longmont, CO.
The Milk Stouts wort is at the final stage of lautering, which is the process of separating sweet wort from the grain bed.

Brew Adam Cranford loading lactose into the lactose doser. “The lactose or milk sugar sweetens (our Milk Stout) and makes it creamier,” head brewer Adam Lawerence said. “Milk stouts are a good way for many people to start exploring darker beers and stouts.”
Lead brewer Tanner Cobb sets up to "spin" the Milk Stout where they pump the beer through a centrifuge to clarify the beer, which removes all solids and organic material that can cause a haze.
Lead brewer Tanner Cobb tests the carbonation of the beer prior to sending it through the centrifuge.
Brewer Adam Cranford holds an aseptic sample taken from the batch of Milk Stout wort so they can test for potential biological contamination.
Lead brewer Tanner Cobb moves the 2-inch hoses they use to move beer throughout the brewing process at Left Hand Brewing Company in Longmont, CO.
Lead brewer Tanner Cobb prepares the bright tank to receive the now clarified, carbonated, nitrogenated and pasteurized Milk Stout beer. The beer is ready to be packaged out of bright tanks.
An overflow pipe is purging out yeast before adding yeast to the wort in the fermenter at Left Hand Brewing Company in Longmont, CO.
Quality Assurance Lab Technician Seth Keith prepares beer for testing in the lab. Testing for IBUs (International Bitterness Units) and diacetyls.
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